Self Management Skills

Self Management Skills Definition

A self management skills definition is as follows: ‘Self-management is the control you exert over your time, your achievement and your personal growth. It is a collection of management skills that sit alongside team management skills and leadership skills.’

Self Management Skills List

So many skills are useful for self-management, so I have included them here as a self management skills list:

1. Time Management Skills

Time management skills are vital to getting things done. Misleadingly, time management doesn’t involve manipulating time, but instead, the tasks you need to do… or do you really need to do them?

2. Project Management Skills

Can you take a large objective and break it down into an action plan? Can you balance two different objectives and create a strategy to achieve the best result? These are important project management skills.

3. Emotional Control

Did you know that as humans, we possess an incredible degree of control over the emotions we feel? It’s true. While many unhappy people mistakenly believe that their poor mood is the result of events, and events are the result of ‘everyone else’, they are passively wandering down the road to unfulfillment. Proactivity is the best cure for unhappiness.

4. Discipline

Can you wake at 5:30am to start on household chores and errands? Not a particularly pleasant sounding experience, but if you’re the type who would laugh at the possibility, and would not see yourself being able to do this in a million years, then discipline is a strength you desire.

Often when people see others exerting discipline, they express pity. However, ask the person who is exercising the discipline, and they’ll share with you how empowering it really feels. A good example is as follows: completing a report in the morning is something we wouldn’t look forward to and would perhaps even avoid because we feel negative towards it. However, someone who actually does complete the report in the morning will have a far better mood all day. Perpetually ‘putting off’ unpleasant tasks is actually far more depressing than actually doing them.

5. Calmness

Part of emotional control, calmness is a self management skill that comes naturally to some and is earnt by others. Approaching a situation in a calm manner will result in clearer decision making that will often be more logical and thorough. The more (negatively) emotionally charged you are while making a decision, the more out-of-line the result will be from your true objectives.

Other self-management skills include: ability to create plans, getting enough sleep, being reliable, being thorough and upholding quality in your work and finally,  idea generation.

Self Management Skills Examples

I would like to use discipline as an example of why self management is important to your success and well-being.

Often when people see others exerting discipline, they express pity.

“Oh look at the terrible task he has chosen to perform! I won’t be doing that until I absolutely have to!”

However, ask the person who is exercising the discipline, and they’ll share with you how empowering taking the challenge and learning from it really feels. A good example is as follows: Completing a report in the morning is something we wouldn’t look forward to and would perhaps even avoid because we feel negatively about it. However, someone who actually does complete the report in the morning will have a far better mood all day and will sleep well at night.

Perpetually ‘putting off’ unpleasant tasks is actually far more depressing than actually doing them. Therefore being able to ignore your hedonistic urges is actually good for your happiness. To rephrase, ignoring your desire for pleasure will reward you with happiness.

Self Management Skills for Students

Self management skills for students are very important because of the lack of guidance, structure and monitoring that happens within a University. If a student procrastinates heavily and leaves everything to last minute, they will be less successful than a student who works ahead of time, despite the fact that the organised student will not have actually expended much more effort.

The time management skills article contains a collection of tips specifically for students wanting to increase the amount of work they get done in a day.

As a student, you will have to teach yourself discipline, as your lecturer will not do this for you. A good way of learning discipline is by taking up extra curricular activities that encourage this self-management skill. A good example would be a sporting activity such as being on the hockey team, or perhaps a non-team sport such as Karate would be more to your liking. The classes and training for both sports will encourage discipline, which will hopefully condition your body to respond less to the immeadiate desire for pleasure and comfort, and be driven more by the desire to succeed, or in the case of sport: win.

This time management guide has been written by Simon Oates for Management-Expert.co.uk. If you’ve enjoyed reading, please link to it from your blog or website to share it with others.

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2 Responses to Self Management Skills

  1. George Nelson says:

    This is really good stuff that will help me in self improvement and be able to monitor, control and manage personal growth.

  2. selam Bogale says:

    i am welling to know more about self management and office management. As per the concept that i have got from the above text am happy by geeting some idea.

    With best regards

    Selam Bogale
    Ethiopia

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